Where Do The 2-Seeds Go? And What About UW?

This is a problem. We are tied by travel distances, but in reality there are not many options. You really cannot send Florida State to Georgia for a third-straight year. You could send them to Florida again, but you can also send South Florida and Central Florida there. In the end, South Florida makes the most sense from a seeding standpoint and Georgia Tech makes the most sense going to Georgia. That being said, I won’t be shocked about anything.

So here’s the grid as I think it stands now.

Travel Grid for 2-Seeds and their projections

Now on my previous post, under the comments section, someone has raised a very good question as to if Washington can ‘jump’ one, two or even three teams? They have direct wins over USD, Portland and Utah State. San Diego is safe because they are an automatic qualifier. But can you jump one to get to the other two?

From the 2017 NCAA Pre-Championship Manual

Selection Criteria. The following criteria shall be employed by a governing sports committee in selecting participants for
NCAA championships competition [Bylaw 31.3.3; criteria for selection of participants]:
●● Won-lost record.
●● Strength of schedule.
●● Eligibility and availability of student-athletes for NCAA championships.

In addition to Bylaw 31.3.3, the tennis committee has received approval from the NCAA Division I Championships/Sports
Management Cabinet to consider the following criteria in the selection of at-large teams for the men’s and women’s tennis
championships (not necessarily in priority order):
Primary Criteria
●● Head-to-head competition.
●● Results versus common opponents.
●● Strength of schedule.
●● Wins versus teams (or individuals) already selected at time of consideration.

So what does this all mean? Also, this is directly afterwards.

Tie-Breaking Procedures
●● If the evaluation of the primary criteria does not result in a decision, the tie-breaking procedures will be reviewed. The
following criteria listed will be evaluated in priority order: Head-to-head competition.
●● Strength of schedule.

Primary Criteria Defined
●● Head-to-head competition.
This is a one-on-one direct comparison between two teams (or individuals). The tennis committee will award a maximum
of two points for defeating the same opponent two or more times.

●● Results versus common opponents.
Other than in cases in which the common opponent analysis is unambiguous (each team or individual has played a common opponent with one team or individual winning and one team or individual losing), the tennis committee will look very closely at the comparison before deciding whether one team or individual has demonstrated a higher level of play versus a common opponent.

●● Strength of schedule.
The Division I Championships/Sports Management Cabinet has approved the following strength-of-schedule definition for Division I tennis: The ITA rankings will be used to represent a combination of four categories (won-lost record or percentage, strength of schedule, significant wins and significant losses). Higher-ranked teams (or individuals) will be awarded a specific number of points based on their percentage difference (using the rankings’ average point-per-match formula) over the team (or individuals) they are being compared with in the selection and seeding process. Points will be awarded on the following scale:
1 point — If higher-ranked team’s (or individual’s) average is 1-10 percent greater than the lower-ranked team’s
(or individual’s) average;
2 points — If higher-ranked team’s (or individual’s) average is 10.1-20 percent greater than the lower-ranked
team’s (or individual’s) average; and
3 points — If higher-ranked team’s (or individual’s) average is 20.1 percent greater than the lower-ranked team’s
(or individual’s) average.

●● Wins versus teams (or individuals) already selected at time of consideration.
A one-point margin is sufficient to win the category. The tennis committee will award a maximum of two points for
defeating the same opponent multiple times.

Wins versus the top 50 teams in the ITA rankings.
Wins versus the top 60 singles players in the ITA rankings for eligible/entered singles players.
Wins versus the top 30 doubles teams in the ITA rankings for entered/eligible doubles teams.

Bottom line, I think Portland may be in trouble.

If that is the case, then Washington cannot just take their place at USC. The easiest would be to send Louisville to USC and Washington to TCU.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *